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An interview with Asta Roseway at Microsoft Research

Posted by on Jul 26, 2011 in Interviews | 17 Comments

I recently visited Microsoft Research (MSR) to meet some of the researchers and designers who are doing some amazing work with wearable technology. One of the designers I met with was Senior Research Designer Asta Roseway (MSR). She recently collaborated with User Experience Designer Sheridan Martin Small (Xbox) on a project called The Printing Dress, which won Best Concept and Best in Show at ISWC 2011 in San Francisco last month.

Here’s a look at their creation, how they made it, and what Asta’s thoughts are about the future of wearable technology.

The Printing Dress
You are probably familiar with the old saying, “You are what you eat” but how about, “You are what you tweet?” What if this concept were incorporated into garments of the future?

The “Printing Dress” is an artistic piece that explores the notion of wearable text and its potential impact on the future of fashion, as well as our social identity. Built almost entirely of paper, the dress enables the wearer to enter “thoughts” on to its fabric and wear them as public art. While constructed from materials of the past, the dress looks towards the future with a message indicating that we are entering into a new realm of social accountability, where you literally wear what you tweet.

The Dress is powered by four Lilypad Arduinos, a laptop, a short throw projector and uses a Processing sketch to display and animate the text.

Interview Participants
Asta Roseway – Senior Research Designer, Microsoft Research
Sheridan Martin Small – User Experience Designer, P10 Incubations/Xbox
Tom Blank – Hardware Engineering Manager, Microsoft Research
Desney Tan – Senior Researcher, Microsoft Research

Special thanks to Artefact, Microsoft Research, Xbox, and Issara Willenskomer at Dos Rios.

Also featured on Engadget, Cnet, PSFK, talk2myshirt, Ecouterre, Microsoft News Center.

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17 Comments

  1. Patrick Warren
    August 3, 2011

    FYI

  2. The Printing Dress - Next at Microsoft - Site Home - TechNet Blogs
    August 5, 2011

    [...] collaboration between Sheridan and Asta Roseway of Microsoft Research. The video above, courtesy of Electricfoxy, does a far better job of explaining the dress than I can. It’s not called out in the video [...]

  3. The Printig Dress | Yiuco Blog
    August 8, 2011

    [...] Everything started with a moto; “you are what you tweet”. The paraphrase of the famous saying “you are what you eat”, has only one to show, the dramatical evolution of human communication. While constructed from materials of the past, the dress looks towards the future with a message indicating that we are entering into a new realm of social accountability, where you literally wear what you tweet. “To reflect the ubiquity of texting on the go”, the designers came up with the concept of a dress composed of a bodice, corset, a paper skirt and a custom keyboard intergrated on the bodice, that allows the wearer to send messages to a display. Read more, just click  here! [...]

  4. The Printing Dress | Yiuco Blog
    August 8, 2011

    [...] Ονομάζεται  Printing Dress,είναι σχεδόν όλο φτιαγμένο από χαρτί και σχεδιάστηκε από την Asta Roseway senior designer στη Microsoft Research και τη Sheridan Martin Small της Xbox. Όλα ξεκίνησαν παραφράζοντας ένα αγγλόφωνο ρητό, το “you are what you eat” σε “you are what you tweet”. Με τούτα κι εκείνα οι σχεδιάστριες ήθελαν να δείξουν τη δραματική εξέλιξη της επικοινωνίας των ανθρώπων. Χρησιμοποιώντας λοιπόν το χαρτί ως βάση, ένα υλικό επικοινωνίας του παρελθόντος, δημιούργησαν ένα high tech φόρεμα το οποίο αποτελείται από μπούστο με ενσωματωμένο πληκτρολόγιο, κορσέ και χάρτινη φούστα. Στη χάρτινη φούστα, με τη βοήθεια ενός lap top, αντικατροπτίζονται στην κυριολεξία τα tweets του καθενός. Για να μάθετε περισσότερα, πατήστε εδώ! [...]

  5. Microsoft Printing Dress: Wear what you tweet | Life Style
    August 8, 2011

    [...] This video features an interview with Asta Roseway for wearable technology blog Electricfoxy. [...]

  6. This and that | Ripple's Web » Microsoft Printing Dress: Wear what you tweet
    August 8, 2011

    [...] This video features an interview with Asta Roseway for wearable technology blog Electricfoxy. [...]

  7. Microsoft Printing Kjole: Brug hvad du tweet - CyberMaster
    August 9, 2011

    [...] video indeholder et interview med Asta Roseway til bærbar teknologi blog Electricfoxy [...]

  8. Three Creative Ways Twitter and Fashion Mix Offline |
    August 12, 2011

    [...] is mainly made out of paper; a nice juxtaposition to the digital words that flit across the skirt. Check out Electricfoxy’s interview with Asta Roseway for more details! Source: [...]

  9. tecnologías textiles « Coolhunting Research
    November 23, 2011

    [...] The printing dress es un vestido de papel que permite recibir tweets que quedan así impresos a la vista del público. [...]

  10. Commencing new project as part of my PhD reseach called “The Speaking Frock” | blipblipi.co.uk
    April 11, 2012

    [...] I am currently working on testing some conductive fabrics to establish the best conductivity for my new project which is called “The Speaking Frock”  I will leave you to guess on that for the moment hopefully enticing you back for a further update.  There is some inspiration found here by the microsoft researchers exhibited at last years ISWC 2011 You are what you tweet – The Printing Dress [...]

  11. Printing Dress on Electricfoxy | asta roseway
    March 27, 2013

    [...] Printing Dress on Electricfoxy Like this:Like Loading… [...]

  12. http://www.getjealous.com/
    May 21, 2014

    Vous rédigez sans cesse des articles intéressants

  13. http://parsimoniousbyw987442.pen.io
    July 12, 2014

    Je vais finir de regarder tout ça dans la soirée

  14. Rueben
    July 13, 2014

    Sujet trop fascinant

  15. The Printing Dress | Next at Microsoft
    July 15, 2014

    [...] collaboration between Sheridan and Asta Roseway of Microsoft Research. The video above, courtesy of Electricfoxy, does a far better job of explaining the dress than I can. It’s not called out in the video [...]

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